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Chapter 4: Decision Making with Control Statements

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Chapter 4: Control Statements & Operators

Computers can do much more than take input and return a simple set of formatted output (like a basic calculator). They can actually decide and perform actions based on the data that’s given to them. This is the basics of algorithm development. Algorithms are sets of rules followed by computers to solve problems. Control statements are statements in Java responsible for determining if other statements get executed, based on certain conditional values.

Conditions are expressions that may be either true or false.

One of the most basic examples (and most frequently used type) of a control statement in Java is the if statement. An if statement is a basic control statement used to make decisions given a condition that is either true or false. We indicate the start of an if statement with the keyword if and follow it with the condition we are checking.

The if statement is structured as follows:

Fig. 4.1a: If Syntax
if (condition) {
    //execute these actions
 }

The curly braces are used to group multiple statements together. While you don't need them if you're only executing one statement, it's good practice to include them anyway so you don't get into the bad habit of forgetting them down the road. If you don't use curly braces, it will only execute the first statement following the if statement. This will be problematic if you want to execute more than one line of code in your if statement, which will probably be most of the time.

We can compare different values to one another using the equality and relational operators. These operators can be used to do things like check if two values are equal and then perform a certain action, or check if two values differ from one another, and perform a different action.

These will always return a boolean value of true or false.

Fig. 4.1b: Table of Comparison Operators
Name Operator Description Example
Equal to == Checks if two values are equal if(x==y)
Not equal to != Checks if two values are not equal if(x!=y)
Less than < Checks if the first value is less than the second if(x<y)
Greater than > Checks if first value is greater than the second if(x>y)
Less than or equal to <= Checks if first value is less than or equal to the second if(x<=y)
Greater than or equal to >= Checks if the first value is greater than or equal to the second if(x>=y)

Conditions can be checked at any time. Since they're operators, they can be used in a similar fashion to the arithmetic operators discussed in the previous chapter. The following program demonstrates using a conditional operator outside of an if statement.

Fig. 4.1c: Conditional Operator Example
int x = 5;
int y = 6;
 
System.out.println(x==y);

Since x is not equal to y, the code x==y will return a value of false to the console.

false

 

2: If Statements With Equality

Let’s take a look at the equality operator “==”. We use two equal signs to determine if two values are equal to one another. We cannot use a single equal sign, because Java's already using that as the assignment operator. Additionally, the “!=” operator checks if two values are not equal to each other. The following lines of code check if the value of x is equal to five or not.

Fig. 4.2a: If Example
public class EqualityTest{
      public static void main(String[] args){
           int x = 5;
           
           if(x==5){
                System.out.println("x is equal to five");
           }
           if(x!=5){
                System.out.println("x is not equal to five");
           }
      }
 }

The output of the program is “x is equal to five” because x is in fact equal to five.

x is equal to five

If you were to change x from 5 to 6 on line 3 it would output:

x is not equal to five

 

3: If Statements with Other Operators

Now let's take a look at some of the other relational operators. This program will check if one value is greater than, less than, less than or equal to, or greater than or equal to another value.

Fig. 4.3a: Operators Example
public class Main {
     public static void main(String[] args) {
        //Initialize Variables
         int a = 5;
         int b = 10;
         int c = 5;
 
         //Check some values with relational operators
         if(a>b){
             System.out.println("a is greater than b");
         }
         if(a<b){
             System.out.println("a is less than b");
         }
         if(a>c){
             System.out.println("a is greater than c");
         }
         if(a>=c){
             System.out.println("a is greater than or equal to c");
         }
         if(a<c){
             System.out.println("a is less than c");
         }
         if(a<=c){
             System.out.println("a is less than or equal to c");
         }
     }
 }

The console output is as follows. Note that no lines were generated for all the statements which were false.

a is less than b
 a is greater than or equal to c
 a is less than or equal to c

 

4: A Sample Program With Multiple Options

Recall the basic calculator program from the last chapter. In this example, we'll do something similar by creating a program that asks the user to enter two values, and then either will add OR subtract the values depending on what the user wants.

Fig. 4.4a: Multiple Options Calculator
import java.util.Scanner;
 
 public class Main {
 
     public static void main(String[] args) {
         //Declare variables.
         int x = 0;
         int y = 0;
         int option = 0;
         int result = 0;
         //Make scanner
         Scanner userInput = new Scanner(System.in);
         //Store values
         System.out.println("Please enter an integer value:");
         x = userInput.nextInt();
         System.out.println("Now enter a second integer value:");
         y = userInput.nextInt();
         System.out.println("Would you like to 1) add or 2) subtract these numbers?");
         option = userInput.nextInt();
         userInput.close();
 
         //Check if they want to add
         if(option==1){
             result = x + y;
             System.out.println("The sum of " + x + " and " + y + " is: " + result);
         }
         //Check if they want to subtract
         if(option==2){
             result = x - y;
             System.out.println("The difference " + x + " - " + y + " is: " + result);
         }
     }
 }
Please enter an integer value:
 10
 Now enter a second integer value:
 5
 Would you like to 1) add or 2) subtract these numbers?
 1
 The sum of 10 and 5 is: 15
       

If you run the program again and enter 2 instead of 1 for the third option, it should subtract them instead.

 

5: If Else & Else If

We're going to be building upon the conditional if statements with the addition of an if-else statement. If else statements are similar to if statements, with the addition of extra sections of code that is executed if the main condition is not met. So if the first condition is not true, it will execute the code in the "else" section of the statement.

The format for an if else statement is as follows:

Fig. 4.5a: If Else Format

       //The regular if statement
       if(condition){
           //code to be executed if the condition is true
       }
       else{
           //code to be executed if the condition is false
       }

Sample Program

The following example asks the user to enter a number and checks if it's over or under a million using an if-else statement.

4.5b: Else Over Under Million
import java.util.Scanner;

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        //Create a Scanner & ask for a number
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println("Enter a number");
        double aDouble = input.nextDouble();
        input.close();
        //Check if it's over a million
        if (aDouble>=1000000){
            System.out.println("That's at least a million!");
        }
        else{
            System.out.println("That's under a million.");
        }
    }
}

Else If

In addition to else, we can also add else if blocks to specify additional conditional logic. They work just like the else blocks discussed above - but we add the if keyword after them to check additional things. So if the first block of code does not execute, it will execute a second block if the condition is met, and if not, it will proceed to the third else if block, fourth, fifth, and so on.

The following example checks how large a number is (if it's a single-digit number, in the 10s, hundreds, or over a thousand).

4.5c: If Else Example
public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println("Please enter a number.");
        double num = input.nextDouble();
        input.close();

        //Check how big the number is
        if (num < 0) {
            System.out.println("You entered a negative number");
        } else if (num < 10) {
            System.out.println("You entered a number between 0 and 10");
        } else if (num < 100) {
            System.out.println("You entered a number in the 10s");
        } else if (num < 1000) {
            System.out.println("You entered a number in the 100s");
        } else{
            System.out.println("You entered a number over 1000");
        }
    }
}
Please enter a number.
25
You entered a number in the 10s

In the above example, 25 is less than 100, but it is also less than 1000. Note that it didn't print out "You entered a number in the 100s," even though the number was also less than 1000. Once the first else if block is satisfied, the following blocks are not executed, regardless of if the conditions are met.

 

6: Checking Multiple Conditions at Once

What if we want to check multiple conditions at the same time?

Nested If Statements

Onc way to do this is with the use of nested if statements. When we say nested, we simply mean one thing placed in another.

The following program checks if a number is between 99 and 1000 using nested if statements.

Fig 4.6a: Nested If Statements
int x = 200;
//Check if the number is greater than 99 but less than 1000
if (x > 99){
    if (x < 1000){
        System.out.println("The number is between 99 and 1000.");
    }
}
The number is between 99 and 1000.

The And Logic Operator

Now let's take a look at a slightly better way to do this using just one if statement. We can achieve this by using the AND operator, which in Java is two ampersand symbols placed between two or more conditions.

Fig 4.6b: And Operator Syntax
if ((condition1)&&(condition2)){
    //actions to execute if both conditions are met
}
if ((condition1)&&(condition2)&&(condition3)){
   //actions to execute if all three conditions are met
}

The following example performs the same check as above using an and operator.

Fig 4.6c: And Operator Example
int x = 200;
//Check if the number is greater than 99 but less than 1000
if ((x > 99)&&(x < 1000)){
    System.out.println("The number is between 99 and 1000.");
}
The number is between 99 and 1000.

The Or Logic Operator

Finally let's talk about the OR operator, which can check if one OR another condition is met. That is, if any of the conditions next to the OR operators are met, the code will execute. So if one condition is true, but another condition is false, it will still execute the block of code. The OR operator in Java is two vertical lines ||

Fig. 4.6d: OR Operator Syntax
int x = 200;
//Check if the number is over 100 or less than 10
if ((x>99)||(x<10)){
    System.out.println("x is over 100 or under 10");
}

Since x is greater than 99 the first condition is met, but the second condition (less than 10) is not met. The code was executed anyways.

x is over 100 or under 10

Combining All Of Them

Note that we can combine any set of nested, AND, and OR conditions.

The following example is a little chaotic, but it checks if a number is greater than 100 AND less than 1000 AND divisible by 5 - or equal to the value 4000.

Fig. 4.6e: Everything Combined Example
public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        /*Check if a number is greater than 100,
        less than 1000, and divisible by 5, or
        is equal to the number four thousand using a
        combination of all we learned.
        * */
        int x = 555;
        //Check if the number is greater than 100
        if(x>100){
            //Check if it's less than 1000 and divisible by 5, or equal to 4000
            if (((x<1000)&&(x%5==0))||(x==4000)){
                System.out.println("x is: " + x);
                System.out.println("Conditions have been met!");
            }
            else{
                System.out.println("Conditions not met.");
            }
        }
        else{
            System.out.println("Conditions not met.");
        }
    }
}
x is: 555
Conditions have been met!

If we change line 9 to x=4000 we get...

x is: 4000
Conditions have been met!

And just to check divisibility by 5, if we change it to x=444 we get...

Conditions not met.

 

7: String Equality and Memory

Take a look at the following code that checks if two Strings are equal to one another:

4.7a: String Equality
String aString = "test";
String bString = "test";
if(aString == bString){
    System.out.println("Strings are equal");
}
else{
    System.out.println("Strings are not equal");
}

The output of the above code is:

Strings are equal

This makes sense, as both Strings have a value of "test." But now consider the following program that checks if the user typed the message "test"

4.7b: String Equality With Scanner
//Make Objects
Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
String aString = "test";
//Get Input
System.out.println("Enter the word test");
String bString = input.nextLine();
//Close Scanner
input.close();
//Check Equality
if(aString == bString){
    System.out.println("Strings are equal");
}
else{
    System.out.println("Strings are not equal.");
    System.out.println("You should have entered: " + aString + " but you entered " + bString);
}

Now let's see what happens when we run the program and enter the word "test"

Enter the word test
test
Strings are not equal.
You should have entered: test but you entered test

Why did the first program checking if aString was equal to bString say they were equal, but the same thing with a String acquired from a Scanner did not? I assure you, I entered the word test properly. Why is it saying I didn't?


Comparing Objects By Reference

To answer the question of what's going on in Figure 4.6b, we need to have an understanding of how the equality operator works in Java, and how Java stores objects in memory.

When we use the == operator on objects, Java checks the reference, or location of the object in the computer's memory, rather than the actual contents of the object.

Usually, this isn't a problem, as Java tries to store equivalent values at a single point in memory. When Java compiles the program with String aString = "test"; String bString = "test"; in example 7a, Java is actually only creating one String object, and both identifiers are referencing the same object in memory. This saves RAM because the JVM only has to store one String in memory rather than two.

how java stores strings in memory Fig. 4.7c: Two Identifiers Point to Same Location

Since Java uses the equality operator == to check if objects are equal based off the memory location they reference, in the first example Figure 4.7a it returns the message "Strings are equal."

Now let's take another look at the second example (Figure 4.7b).

In the second example, we created aString at compile-time, but we did not assign a value to bString, as we were waiting for input from the Scanner. Therefore, Java actually created two separate objects in memory rather than just one.

Since the equality operator checks the references and finds that the references are different, Java says that the Strings are NOT equal even though they have identical contents.

Note that this can happen with other types of variables as well. It's safe to use the == operator on primitive data types (ints, doubles, bools, etc.) - but not on objects like Strings. Recall that Strings are not a primitive data type.

So how do we check if two strings have the same contents if the == operator isn't an option?

how memory addresses change with java Fig. 4.7d: Java Creates Multiple Objects With Same Value

 

8: The Equals Method

The equals() method can be used to check if the contents of one variable are equivalent to the contents of another, regardless of where each object is stored in memory.

The example below checks if two Strings are equivalent using the equals method.

4.8a: String Equality
String aString = "test";
String bString = "test";
System.out.println(aString.equals(bString));
true

Now let's fix the example from Figure 7b.

4.8b: String Equality With Scanner (Fixed)
//Make Objects
Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
String aString = "test";
//Get Input
System.out.println("Enter the word test");
String bString = input.nextLine();
//Close Scanner
input.close();
//Check Equality
if(aString.equals(bString)){
    System.out.println("Strings are equal");
}
else{
    System.out.println("Strings are not equal.");
    System.out.println("You should have entered: " + aString + " but you entered " + bString);
}
Enter the word test
test
Strings are equal

You can also check if two Strings are not equal to each other by adding an exclamation mark in front of the boolean. This is like saying "if false... do this." The exclamation mark is the logical not operator.

Fig 4.8c: If Not
        if(!aString.equals(bString)){
            System.out.println("Strings are not equal");
        }
        else{
            System.out.println("Strings are equal.");
        }

 

9: Switches

The final control statement we'll be examining in this section is Switches. Switches are statements used to select one option from a series of different available options. They work with the byte, short, char, and int primitive data types. They also work with Enums, which is something we will discuss in a later section.

Switches are divided into different blocks of code known as cases, so in each "case" we do some different action. Rather than the curly braces used to section off blocks of code in our previous examples, each switch block begins with the keyword case and ends with a break statement, made using the keyword break.

Let's dive into this and look at an example. The following switch takes an integer and prints out some of the milestones associated with early childhood development (babies).

Fig. 4.9a: Baby Development Switch
//An integer representing the baby age in months
int babyAge = 3;

//Switch milestones
switch (babyAge) {
    case 6: System.out.println("Baby starts to explore environment!");
            break;
    case 5: System.out.println("Baby can look at themselves in mirror!");
            break;
    case 4: System.out.println("Baby copies facial expressions!");
            break; 
    case 3: System.out.println("Baby can track objects!");
            break;
    case 2: System.out.println("Baby starts smiling!");
            break;
    case 1: System.out.println("Baby starts learning faces!");
            break;
    case 0: System.out.println("Baby is Born!");
            break;   
}

Since the int is equal to 3, the switch block for case 3: will be executed.

Baby can track objects!

The Default Section

Another section, called the default section, is executed when the other cases are not. This is similar to an else block in our previously discussed if statements.

4.9b: Default Section
//An integer representing the baby age in months
int babyAge = 8;

//Switch milestones
switch (babyAge) {
    case 2: System.out.println("Baby starts smiling!");
            break;
    case 1: System.out.println("Baby starts learning faces!");
            break;
    case 0: System.out.println("Baby is Born!");
            break;   
    default: System.out.println("I don't know what babies do at this age.");
            break;
}
I don't know what babies do at this age.

Fall Through Switches

If we take out the break statements, we can allow the switch to fall through, which results in the switch skipping the blocks up until it reaches the appropriate case, and still executes the remaining code until it reaches a break.

To demonstrate this, in the following code, I have removed all the breaks except for the default case. This means it will print out the milestones for each age up until it gets to the section with the current age.

4.9c: Baby Age Fallthrough
//An integer representing the baby age in months
int babyAge = 3;

//Switch milestones

    switch (babyAge) {
        case 6: System.out.println("Baby starts to explore environment!");

        case 5: System.out.println("Baby can look at themselves in mirror!");

        case 4: System.out.println("Baby copies facial expressions!");

        case 3: System.out.println("Baby can track objects!");

        case 2: System.out.println("Baby starts smiling!");

        case 1: System.out.println("Baby starts learning faces!");

        case 0: System.out.println("Baby is Born!");

        default: break;
    }

Since I entered the age of 3, it will skip over cases 6, 5, and 4, then start executing on the switch block with case 3. All the following blocks from 3 to default are then executed.

Baby can track objects!
Baby starts smiling!
Baby starts learning faces!
Baby is Born!

In most situations where we see fall-through switches, the break will be in the default section at the end. However, you can place the break in any of the other cases and Java will exit the switch at that point.

Also, note that I intentionally ordered this switch by age from older to younger - allowing it to fall through and display all the milestones currently achieved. If I ordered the cases from 0 to 6 instead of 6 to 0, it would have printed out the milestones coming after the baby's current age (in other words, it would have printed milestones 3 through 6 instead of 3 through 0).

Default at Top

For our final example, we'll take a look at switch behavior when we place the default section at the top instead of the bottom.

Take a look at the following code, which doesn't do anything particularly important other than demonstrate a concept. What do you think the output will be if we set int x equal to five?

//create int to test
int tester = 5;
//Switch
switch (tester) {
   default: System.out.println("Default");
   case 1: System.out.println("One");
   case 2: System.out.println("Two");
   case 3: System.out.println("Three");
   break;
}

The output pretty much works the same way the last switch did. Since the int value of 5 is not in the list, it falls through and prints out everything, starting with the default block.

Default
One
Two
Three

Now let's take a look at what happens when we set the integer to value 2. Will it print out the default block and cases 2-3? Or will it just print out cases 2-3?

//create int to test
int tester = 2;
//Switch
switch (tester) {
   default: System.out.println("Default");
   case 1: System.out.println("One");
   case 2: System.out.println("Two");
   case 3: System.out.println("Three");
   break;
}

In this scenario, it will skip the default block, because the number 2 exists as one of the cases. It just prints out:

Two
Three

So in other words, the default block is only used if none of the other cases match, even if placed before all other cases. It's not a generic block that's guaranteed to run every time.

 

decorative image of a piggy bank with an american flag

Review Exercise: Federal Income Tax Calculator (USA)

In this review exercise, we are going to make a calculator that determines the total amount a user pays in towards federal taxes at each bracket level based on their provided annual income.

It is important to understand how tax brackets work if you do not know how they work already. In the USA taxes are based on these tax brackets. You pay the applicable taxes on your income at the rate specified in each specific bracket for that individual portion of your income. Take an example with someone making $25,000 a year. The first $9,950 is taxed at 10%. The remaining $15,050 is taxed at 12%. The entire 25,000 is not taxed at 12%. This way, someone on the border of tax brackets won't be losing money by making more income. More income always equals more money in your pocket (as far as federal taxes go, at least).

Federal income tax in the United States for individuals is calculated according to this table.

Income Tax Rate
Zero to $9950 10%
$9951 to $40525 12%
$40526 to $86375 22%
$86376 to $164925 24%
$164926 to $209425 32%
$209426 to $523600 35%
$523601 or more 37%

Assignment Instructions

Using conditional statements however you would like, create a program that calculates the amount of taxes owed at each income bracket, the total amount of the taxes they should expect to pay, and the final ratio of taxes to income expressed as a percentage. Use a Scanner to read the user input and double values to store the money (even though I said we shouldn't use doubles for currency, in this example it's okay, as it's more of an estimator rather than a full-fledged banking application) There are multiple ways to go about doing this. Assume there are no deductions or tax credits to take into consideration - just go off the gross income.

Sample Output

When compiled, your program should execute something like this:

Please enter your total income for this year.
500000
Breakdown by tax bracket:
Bracket 1: $995.0
Bracket 2: $3668.8799999999997
Bracket 3: $10086.78
Bracket 4: $18851.76
Bracket 5: $14239.68
Bracket 6: $106497.65
Bracket 7: $0.0
Total Federal Taxes Owed: $154339.75
Average tax rate across all brackets:30.86795%

Suggested Steps

  1. Create a Scanner, get input as a double, and close the Scanner
  2. Determine the total amount you need to tax in each bracket
  3. Use a variable to keep track of the remaining income to tax after calculating each bracket
  4. Use conditions to check if we need to proceed to the next bracket, or stop at this one.
  5. If we know we won't make it to the next bracket, we calculate the taxes for the last bracket as the remaining amount to tax multiplied by the rate.
  6. If we need to go to a higher bracket, we know we need to calculate taxes for the current bracket as the difference between the start and end income of the bracket multiplied by the percentage
  7. Calculate totals and output the results

Here is a suggested solution. Note that there are other ways to calculate this, and remember that this calculator isn't 100% accurate. Don't base your actual taxes off this. There are better and shorter ways to do this as well, I just did it this way because I thought it was the easiest way to understand what's going on. If you did it differently, you can check your work by seeing if entering 500,000 produces similar results to my above example.

package com.kevinsguides;

//imports
import java.util.Scanner;

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        //Create scanner
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);

        //Prompt user for info
        System.out.println("Please enter your total income for this year.");
        double userIncome = input.nextDouble();

        //Close the scanner
        input.close();

        //Create some variables to keep track of things
        //totalIncomeToTax will hold the remaining amount of income that still needs to be taxed in each bracket
        double totalIncomeToTax = userIncome;
        //Initialize some variables to keep track of taxes owed on each bracket
        double bracket1 = 0; double bracket2 = 0; double bracket3 = 0; double bracket4 = 0; double bracket5 = 0; double bracket6 = 0; double bracket7 = 0;


        //Start calculating!
        //First Bracket
        //If they are making less than $9950
        if (totalIncomeToTax<=9950){
            //Their bracket1 taxes will be equal to total taxes paid, as they hit no other brackets
            bracket1 = totalIncomeToTax * 0.10;
            //Set remaining income to tax to zero, as there will be no leftover income to tax in additional brackets
            totalIncomeToTax = 0;
        }
        else{
            //If theyre in a higher bracket, find the amount owed on bracket 1
            bracket1 = 9950 * 0.10;
            //Subtract 9950 from the portion of income that is still taxable
            totalIncomeToTax -= 9950;

        }

        //Second Bracket
        //check if they have taxes to pay in this bracket
        if (totalIncomeToTax > 0){
            //The second bracket is from $9951 to $40525 at 12%
            //This means a maximum of $30574 can be taxed from bracket
            if (totalIncomeToTax < 30574){
                //If the leftover income to tax is less than 30574, we know this will be the last bracket of taxes to calculate.
                //Find how much is owed on this bracket
                bracket2 = totalIncomeToTax * 0.12;
                totalIncomeToTax = 0;
            }
            else{
                //They are going onto the third bracket, tax the full amount of the second.
                bracket2 = 30574 * 0.12;
                totalIncomeToTax -= 30574;
            }
        }

        //Third Bracket
        //The following brackets follow the same structure as the second, so I wont be adding additional comments
        if (totalIncomeToTax > 0){
            if (totalIncomeToTax < 45849){
                bracket3 = totalIncomeToTax * 0.22;
                totalIncomeToTax = 0;
            }
            else{
                bracket3 = 45849 * 0.22;
                totalIncomeToTax -= 32149;
            }
        }

        //Fourth Bracket
        if (totalIncomeToTax > 0){
            if (totalIncomeToTax < 78549){
                bracket4 = totalIncomeToTax * 0.24;
                totalIncomeToTax = 0;
            }
            else{
                bracket4 = 78549 * 0.24;
                totalIncomeToTax -= 78549;
            }
        }
        //Fifth Bracket
        if (totalIncomeToTax > 0){
            if (totalIncomeToTax < 44499){
                bracket5 = totalIncomeToTax * 0.32;
                totalIncomeToTax = 0;
            }
            else{
                bracket5 = 44499 * 0.32;
                totalIncomeToTax -= 44499;
            }
        }
        //Sixth Bracket
        if (totalIncomeToTax > 0){
            if (totalIncomeToTax < 314174){
                bracket6 = totalIncomeToTax * 0.35;
                totalIncomeToTax = 0;
            }
            else{
                bracket6 = 314174 * 0.35;
                totalIncomeToTax -= 314174;
            }
        }
        //Final Bracket
        if (totalIncomeToTax > 0){
            //There are no other brackets, tax whatevers left.
            bracket7 = totalIncomeToTax * 0.37;
            totalIncomeToTax = 0;
        }

        //Final Calculations
        //Get the total amount in taxes
        double totalTaxesPaid = bracket1 + bracket2 + bracket3 + bracket4 + bracket5 + bracket6 + bracket7;
        //Figure out what this is as a percent of their total original provided income
        double percentage = totalTaxesPaid/userIncome * 100;

        //Print out the results

        System.out.println("Breakdown by tax bracket:");
        System.out.println("Bracket 1: $"+bracket1);
        System.out.println("Bracket 2: $"+bracket2);
        System.out.println("Bracket 3: $"+bracket3);
        System.out.println("Bracket 4: $"+bracket4);
        System.out.println("Bracket 5: $"+bracket5);
        System.out.println("Bracket 6: $"+bracket6);
        System.out.println("Bracket 7: $"+bracket7);
        System.out.println("Total Federal Taxes Owed: $"+totalTaxesPaid);
        System.out.println("Average tax rate across all brackets:" + percentage + "%");

    }
}

 

 

Conclusion

In this section we discussed learned how to use control statements to make decisions in Java. We also learned about how Java stores objects in memory, and why we need to use the equals method for variables that are not primitive data types. If you didn't know it already, you should now know how tax brackets work, and some of the stages of baby development. Haha. I hope you found this useful. In the next section you will learn about working with BigDecimals to perform precise calculations and the basics of memory management.

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